Browsing the Stacks

Our library is full of treasures.  For example, we have 3 copies of the art magazine Verve.  Launched in 1937, by French publisher Tériade, the magazine was focused on raising awareness of art to a new generation of painters and intellectuals.  The reproductions are stunning and even after 80 years, they still retain their high-quality.

The magazine was published in both English and French with covers and illustrations by influential artists like Georges Braque, Marc Chagall, Vasily Kandinsky, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso, with accompanied text written by Albert Camus, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Andre Malraux, and Jean-Paul Sartre, to name a few. The magazine ran from 1937–1960 with 38 issues.

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The decision between gods and mortals…

In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child: she doesn’t have the powers of her parents, so she turns to the world of mortals for companionship where she discovers that she does possess power–the power of witchcraft. Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island. Here is where she hones her craft and meets the most famous figures of mythology. But Circe stands alone, and draws the wrath of both men and gods. In order to protect what she loves, Circe must summon all her strength and choose: mortals or gods.

Check this out and many more in the Popular Reading Collection!

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From the Archives & Special Collections: Celebrating 48 Years of Lū’au History

Figure 1 Event Poster for Friday’s event.

At the beginning of this academic year, the Archives & Special Collections department decided that one of our goals would be to collect more student life materials. With that in mind, I attended LogJam in September to meet some student club leaders and let them know that the archives existed and we’d be interested in preserving their materials. It was great to meet a few student leaders, but I left unsure whether I’d made an impression.

Much to my delight, I received a message from the Hawaiian student group, Ka ‘Ohana Me Ke Aloha. They said they’d recently gone through their storage area and realized that some of their belongings could be better protected in the archives. As of the beginning of the year, we only had a small box of Hawaiian student life items, containing three Lū’au programs and a few VHS tapes and CDs. We met a week or so later so I could get a feel for the types of things they had and then we discussed the logistics of transferring the items to the archives. Although it took a while to transfer the materials, we now have a collection of Ka ‘Ohana Me Ke Aloha materials that more accurately reflects their time and impact on campus.

Figure 2: Photo from the 1976 Lū’au

To celebrate nearly fifty years of Hawaiian student life on campus–their predecessor Hui O Hawaii became a ratified ASPUS club in November of 1970–the Archives & Special Collections is hosting an Open House to showcase the new materials before this year’s Lū’au. The Open House will highlight Lū’au and the other achievements of Ka ‘Ohana Me Ke Aloha over the years, including scrapbooks, awards, photographs, Lū’au programs and recordings. This event is free and open to campus members, alums, and the outside community. Our hope is that the Open House will honor the many contributions of our Hawaiian students to campus life, as well as garner excitement for their upcoming 50th anniversary in 2020. We highly encourage everyone to come to the Open House this Friday!!

Event details:
Date: Friday, April 13th
Time: 4-5pm
Location: Archives & Special Collections, 2nd floor Collins Memorial Library

If you’re a part of a student club that would like to transfer your materials (historic or current) to the archives, please contact Adriana Flores, Archivist & Special Collections Librarian, at archives@pugetsound.edu.

The Archives & Special Collections is open on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. or by appointment.

By Adriana Flores

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Research Marathon at Collins Library! April 17-18, 8:30pm-11:30pm, Library 118

Research Marathon at
Collins Library

Library 118
8:30 to 11:30 pm
Tuesday, April 17, and Wednesday, April 18

Wherever you are in the research process, join us for expert help, camaraderie, and snacks! Peer Research Advisors and librarians will be available for on-the-spot research consultations.

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Library 24/7 Hours are Apr 29-May 1 and May 6-10!

Collins Library wants you prepared for Mid-terms and Finals Week!

The library hours during that period will be:

Apr 29 – May 1 Sun – Tues 9 a.m. – Open 24 Hrs.
 May 2 Wed Closing at 2 a.m.
May 3 – 4 Thur – Fri 7:30 a.m. – 2 a.m.
May 5 Sat 9 a.m. – 2 a.m.
May 6 – 10 Sun – Thur 9 a.m. – Open 24 Hrs.
May 11 Fri Closing at 6 p.m.
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Collins Library Links: Celebrating Libraries

2013_CollinsLibraryLink

Celebrating Libraries

This week Collins Library joins libraries nationwide in celebrating the many ways libraries, and library staff, lead their communities through the transformative services, programs, collections, and expertise they offer.  April 8-14 is National Library Week, an annual celebration of the value of libraries.  Libraries are creative and engaging centers where students, faculty, and staff can collaborate and be inspired to develop their skills and passions.

Tuesday, April 10 is National Library Workers Day, a day to recognize the valuable contributions made by all library staff. #nlwd18.  It’s a chance to say thank you to library staff who alter their work day to ensure we have 24/7 coverage, who take on new and challenging work such as the Makerspace to inspire students, who spend hours in and out of the classroom with students to ensure they find the materials they need, and for the many rush orders fulfilled.

In addition, we are hosting several events that celebrate libraries and reading:

Thursday April 12:
Artists’ Books and Social Justice:  Marshall Weber, social activist and book artist, will share information on Booklyn, a cooperative dedicated to promoting social justice through unique publications. Archives:  11:30 – 12:30

Poetry Reading by Glenna Jackson.  Glenna Jackson will read from her first full-length poetry collection, Thresholds.  She holds a B.A. in English Literature and, while at Puget Sound, she won the Hearst Essay Prize for the Humanities and the Nixeon Civille Handy Prize for Poetry.  Archives:  2:00 – 3:00

Monday April 23:
Presentation on the recently published Home Team: The Turbulent History of the San Francisco Giants by author Rob Garrett.  Welcome back Robert F. Garratt.  Garratt is emeritus professor of English and humanities and has published books and articles on modern Irish literature, including the recent Trauma and History in the Irish Novel: The Return of the Dead. His baseball articles have appeared in NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture and the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) Baseball Biography Project.  Room 020: 4:00-5:00

Check out one of our favorite videos: What is your favorite book?


Need Information? Don’t forget the Collins Memorial Library – Library Guides
Questions? Contact your liaison librarian
Comments: Contact Jane Carlin, library director
Remember – Your best search engine is a librarian!

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Evan Pano finds his voice in the world where he was always silent.

Seventeen-year-old Evan Pano’s strict, immigrant, Greek, mother only sees him as a disappointment and nothing else. His quiet, workaholic father is a believer in avoiding conflict. Lastly, his best friend, Henry, has become extremely attractive over the summer. Tired, isolated, and scared Evan finds that his only escape is to draw in an abandoned monastery which feels as lonely as he is. Sure he kissed one guy over the summer but now, Henry is proving to be irresistible. To top it off Henry seems to be interested in being more than friends. Henry, makes him believe that he deserves more than his mother’s harsh words. But, as things with Henry get more heated and his mother’s abuse gets worse, Evan has to find his voice in the world where he has always been silent.

Check this out in the Popular Reading Collection!

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From the Archives & Special Collections: The Caldecott Books

Since 1938, the American Library Association has awarded the Caldecott Medal to the artist who created the most distinguished “American Picture Book for Children” published in the United States during the preceding year. The medal is named after British illustrator Randolph Caldecott (1846-1886). Caldecott had a significant impact on the illustration of children’s books during his time and published sixteen books of nursery rhymes and poems for children between 1876 and 1885. The American Library Association states that Caldecott’s illustrations “were unique to their time in both their humor, and their ability to create a sense of movement, vitality, and action that complemented the stories they accompanied.” We have three books illustrated by Randolph Caldecott in the Archives & Special Collections: The Three Jovial Huntsmen, The Diverting History of John Gilpin, and The Owls of Olynn Belfry.

The Three Jovial Hunstmen (1880) is a version of an old Lancashire County rhyme which had been circulating in England for centuries. An odd fun fact about this book – Beatrix Potter’s father purchased the original illustrations for this book in 1884 for 80 pounds! Potter was a children’s book author and illustrator herself, famous for the “Peter Rabbit” series.

The Three Jovial Hunstmen (1880)

The Diverting History of John Gilpin (1878) is notable because the illustration on the front cover of John Gilpin on a runaway horse is replicated on the front of the Caldecott Medal itself. This is also the only one of Caldecott’s 16 books that contains full color double page pictures, the process of which ultimately proved too costly to reproduce cheaply. Caldecott’s books were sold for only one shilling each.

The Diverting History of John Gilpin (1878)

The Owls of Olynn Belfry (c. 1885) was illustrated by Caldecott but written by an author identified only as A.Y.D. This book is of interest because many of the scenes and people depicted by Caldecott were from Chelsfield, Kent in England, the home of his wife, Marian Brind.

The Owls of Olynn Belfry (c. 1885)

Head to the Archives & Special Collections to see these and other children’s books from the 19th and 20th centuries!

The Archives & Special Collections is open on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. or by appointment.

By  Laura Edgar

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If only she could remember what happened…

For Cassandra Bowden, hungover mornings are nothing new. She is a binge drinker, and since her job as a flight attendant makes it easy to find adventure, blackouts seem inevitable. She lives with her blackouts in partner with her self-loathing. However, when she awakens in a Dubai hotel room, she does not expect to see her partner of the night covered in blood. Too afraid to call the police, Cassandra starts her long trail of lies. She lies to her coworkers, she lies on her way to Paris, and she lies to the FBI agents who meet her at her gate. Did she kill the man in the hotel room? If not, who did?

Check out this book and more in the Popular Reading Collection!

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Home Team: The Turbulent History of the San Francisco Giants, Book Talk by author Rob Garrett, April 23, 4:00-5:00pm, Library Room 20

Books will be available for purchase. Refreshments will be served.

Robert F. Garratt is emeritus professor of English and humanities at University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Wash. He has published books and articles on modern Irish literature, including the recent Trauma and History in the Irish Novel: The Return of the Dead. His baseball articles have appeared in NINE: A Journal of Baseball History and Culture and the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) Baseball Biography Project.

List of interviews/news reports about Rob Garratt’s book:

San Francisco Chronicle:
http://www.sfchronicle.com/books/article/Two-new-books-about-the-Giants-Lefty-11153926.php

Christian Science Monitor:
https://www.csmonitor.com/Books/2017/0329/10-baseball-books-to-usher-in-the-2017-season/Dynastic-Bombastic-Fantastic-by-Jason-Turbow

Ron Barr Sports Byline radio interview mp3:
http://www.sportsbyline.com/broadcast/SBUSA/SBUSA_ROBERT_GARRATT.mp3

Sport Collectors Digest:
http://www.sportscollectorsdigest.com/best-baseball-books-2017/

Farther off the Wall (Calif) : http://www.insidesocal.com/tomhoffarth/2017/04/24/30-baseball-books-april-17-day-25-lefty-odoul-san-francisco-treat/

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