The Club that Rewrites Personal Stories

DirtyBookClubM.J. Stark has the picture-perfect life in New York City, but behind this life is a sense of debilitating loneliness. When her boss backstabs her and her boyfriend offers her a new life in California, she takes it.  Once there, she is left to herself with the ocean and her elderly neighbor.  When her neighbor moves to Paris, she leaves M.J. an invitation to a secret club: one that only reads erotic books.  M.J. grows curious and accepts meeting the three other hand-selected club members: Addie, who is sex obsessed and avoids responsibility; Britt, an overloaded mom whose husband leaves her wanting someone new; and Jules, a hopeless romantic whose fairy-tale life is falling apart. As they bond over naughty bestsellers, they learn friendship might just be what they need to rewrite their own stories.

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From the Archives & Special Collections: Tamanawas

archives_10-18At our Open House for Homecoming and Family Weekend, we got a question about the origin of the title of the yearbook, Tamanawas. Volume 1 of Tamanawas was published for the 1920-1921 school year. According to the UPS website, Tamanawas is a Salish term that means “the coming of age”. A more complete description can be found in the 1920-1921 Tamanawas, where it says that “Too-man-a-wus is the term used by the aboriginal people of the Northwest for a man or woman who has become, by long work, training and sever tests, following rules laid down by custom, to be an efficient healer of diseases and by the guiding hand of the medicine spirit to give correct diagnosis… Too-man-a-wus was therefore the goal of only the brave, the fearless and worthy ones”. To obtain this definition, the yearbook staff (the juniors of CPS) consulted Mr. Henry Sicade, “a Northwest Indian residing here in [their] midst.”

However, it appears that that meaning may have been misunderstood at times. For example, in the same issue of Tamanawas, the greetings at the beginning of the yearbook mention the “punch and ‘good spirits’ characterized by the ‘Tamanawas’”, and in the February 1920 issue of The Trail, it says: “’Tamanawas’ – Do you know what that symbolizes? It stands for ‘Lively Spirit,’ and C.P.S. annual”.

What many people don’t know is that before it was called Tamanawas, the yearbook was called Klahowya, first published in 1913. We only have the one issue (1912-1913) of the yearbook under that title, but it’s unclear whether a yearbook was actually published between 1913 and 1921. Klahowya is another Native American term, meaning “Please help me” or “I’m miserable” in Chinook”. According to the Children of Fort Langley (an organization dedicated to the history of Fort Langley in British Columbia”, the use of the term Klahowya as a greeting may have been a misunderstanding; native people “begging for goods or food” was so common that white men assumed that it was a standard greeting. (source). This assumption is backed up by the March 1912 issue of The Trail, which mentions the use of Klahowya at All-University Day, saying: “Juniors arose and, solemnly bowing to the guests, gave the good old Indian greeting ‘Klahowya’. The Freshmen could not fully appreciate the meaning of it all”, which indicates that at some point, the phrase had some special meaning to the students of the University of Puget Sound, but that they didn’t understand the origin of the phrase.

Come check out our collection of yearbooks going back to 1913 if you want to learn more!

The Archives & Special Collections is open on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 12:00-3:00 p.m. or by appointment.

By Julia Masur

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Collins Library Links: Welcome Back – Part II

2013_CollinsLibraryLink

Welcome Back – Part II

CALLOUT_CollinsLinksResourcesThe Library provides access to a number of resources that support life-long learning.  Consult this LibGuide prepared by librarian Andrea Kueter which highlights useful news, health, financial, leisure, and consumer resources:

http://research.pugetsound.edu/c.php?g=304589&p=2030739

And don’t forget to establish accounts for digital access to these two great news resources:

New York Times:  The Collins Library and ASUPS have partnered to continue to support a campus-wide license for digital access to the New York Times.  If you have not signed up for your account, it is easy to do.  Just follow these steps:

From a campus network connected computer:

  • Go to: http://accessnyt.com
  • Click “Create Account” and complete the registration fields using your @pugetsound.edu email address.
  • If you have previously registered your email address on The NYT site, click the “Already have an account? Log in here” link just below the “Create Account” button.

Chronicle of Higher Education:  Collins Library retains a premium subscription to this important resource.  Visit the homepage from a campus network connected computer and establish an account to have content delivered to your email address.  Just click on the Login button on the far right corner of the screen and follow the steps.  http://www.chronicle.com/


Need Information? Don’t forget the Collins Memorial Library – Library Guides
Questions? Contact your liaison librarian
Comments: Contact Jane Carlin, library director
Remember – Your best search engine is a librarian!

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Lecture: “Nonviolence Ain’t What It Used to Be: Unarmed Insurrection and The Rhetoric of Resistance”, October 26, 6:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, Rm. 103

nonviolenceaint_bookcoverU.S. social movements face many challenges. One of their most troublesome involves the question of nonviolence. Civil disobedience and symbolic protest have characterized many struggles in the U.S. since the Civil Rights era, but conditions have changed. Corporate media has consolidated, the police have militarized, and dissent has been largely co-opted and institutionalized, but the strategic tools radicals employ haven’t necessarily kept pace. Our narratives, borrowed from movements of the past, are falling short.

Shon Meckfessel, professor of English at Highline College, will map emerging, more militant approaches that are developing to fill the gap, from Occupy to Black Lives Matter. He’ll offer new angles on a seemingly intractable debate, introducing ideas that carve out a larger middle ground between camps in order to chart an effective path forward.

Meckfessel is the author of Nonviolence Ain’t What It Used To Be: Unarmed Insurrection and the Rhetoric of Resistance, and has been active in disruptive social movements for nearly 25 years, beginning in his native Sacramento, Calif. After blocking highways to stop the first Persian Gulf War, he was never again inclined to petitionary protest. He has since researched and participated in social movements across the U.S., Western and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America. Meckfessel is also the author of Suffled How It Gush: A North American Anarchist in the Balkans as well as numerous essays and articles. He has appeared as a social movement scholar and advocate in the New York Times and on Democracy Now, Al Jazeera, CNN, NPR, BBC Radio, and KEXP.

Sponsored by Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Department of Politics and Government, Center for Intercultural and Civic Engagement, and Collins Memorial Library

Accessibility Information
Email: accessibility@pugetsound.edu
Online: pugetsound.edu/accessibility

 

 

 

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The Weight of Secrets and Dangers of Rules

LittleFiresShaker Heights is a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, where everything is planned out, from the roads to the colors of houses. No one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson. Enter Mia Warren, an enigmatic artist and single mother, who moves in to this bubble with her teenage daughter, Pearl. Renting from the Richardson’s, the pair soon become more than just tenants. However when the Richardson’s old family friends attempt to adopt a Chinese American baby, a custody battle erupts, dividing the town, and putting Mia and Elena on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia’s motives, Elena is determined to discover the secrets of Mia’s past. Little Fires Everywhere traces the intertwined fates of the picture-perfect Richardson’s and the enigmatic mother and daughter duo.

Check it out in the Popular Reading Collection today!

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Academic Publishing: A New Approach – The Lever Press

LeverPressLogoWednesday October 18, 2017
Archives & Special Collections Seminar Room
Collins Library
3:00-4:00
Coffee and Light Refreshments

Mark Edington, publisher of the Lever Press, will provide an overview of this new academic press launched by liberal arts colleges across the country to create an effective alternative means for scholars worldwide to publish their work.

The press is open-access, and peer-reviewed works will available both in print, for a small cost, and online, for no cost. Works from scholars and researchers across all disciplines will be considered. The new press is funded by a consortium of 80 liberal arts college libraries, and guided by a partnership of Amherst College Press and Michigan Publishing at the University of Michigan.  Collins Library/University of Puget Sound is a founding member of the Press.

To learn more about Lever Press: https://youtu.be/TCsH5_r0QeM

From Mark Edington:

What is the latest news from the front lines of the “crisis in scholarly communication”? If the links between scholars, publishers, and research libraries form an essential infrastructure of ideas, what is the current state of that infrastructure—and how might a smarter use of the resources available make for better outcomes and greater impact for the ideas scholars publish?

Increasingly, libraries—the chief source of those resources—are seeing that if they took a more active role in supporting scholarly publishing, they could catalyze the emergence of new business models committed to the rigor of peer review with an open access result. These models would make possible maintaining the best of the scholarly publishing legacy we’ve inherited, while adapting the publishing process to new possibilities in digital scholarship and communication.

The University of Puget Sound has joined the Lever Press consortium—a group of institutions seeking to bring about just this change by pooling resources to support a new model for scholarly publishing. Lever Press is now accepting proposals from authors and creating an editorial list aligned with three basic commitments: to be a peer-reviewed, fully open access press (with no “book processing fees” charged to authors), that is aligned with the ethos and mission of liberal arts institutions.

Mark Edington, the publisher of Lever Press, is a scholarly publisher and social entrepreneur who serves as part of the Lever Press leadership team. A graduate of Albion College, Harvard Divinity School, and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Edington is the director of Amherst College Press. Prior to coming to Amherst he served in senior administrative posts at Harvard University, where he led units in the Divinity School, the Kennedy School of Government, and Harvard’s central administration.

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From the Archives & Special Collections: October is Archives Month!

The Puget Sound Centennial quilt is a great example of Puget Sound history and a great item to reflect on during Archives month! Alums worked together to craft this quilt in 1986 to celebrate 100 years of Puget Sound history. The quilt now lives in the Archives & Special Collections to be preserved for years to come!

The Puget Sound Centennial quilt is a great example of Puget Sound history and a great item to reflect on during Archives month! Alums worked together to craft this quilt in 1986 to celebrate 100 years of Puget Sound history. The quilt now lives in the Archives & Special Collections to be preserved for years to come!

Every year in October we celebrate American Archives Month to raise awareness about the importance of preserving, cataloging, and caring for important materials. This month we celebrate archives and archivists across the country. Join in on the American Archives Month celebration at the University of Puget Sound by exploring our digital collections: browse historic photographs of campus in A Sound Past, check out some cool university ephemera, or search our student newspaper “The Trail”.  Or stop by the Archives & Special Collections and look through old manuscripts, artists’ books, and many other collections. Archivists have the important responsibility of preserving the heritage of our country, state, and school so take the opportunity to discover these historical treasures.

Depicted here are the quilters who created the amazing Centennial Quilt. They are, from left: Joanne Neff Cross '53, Renae Paine '76, Liz Gallo, Rose Henry, Kathleen Weidkamp Peterson '67, and Karen Peterson Finney '67.

Depicted here are the quilters who created the amazing Centennial Quilt. They are, from left: Joanne Neff Cross ’53, Renae Paine ’76, Liz Gallo, Rose Henry, Kathleen Weidkamp Peterson ’67, and Karen Peterson Finney ’67.

The Archives & Special Collections is open on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday from 12:00-3:00 p.m. or by appointment.

By Sierra Scott

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Behind the Archives Door: Open House! Monday, October 30, 4 p.m., A&SC Seminar room, Collins Library

BTAD_OpenHouseHave you ever wondered exactly what an archivist does all day? Join us for an open house. Tour our spaces for a behind the scenes look at the Archives & Special Collections and learn how we process archival materials and get them ready for use by our researchers. 4:00–5:00 p.m. light refreshments and an informal lecture. Archives & Special Collections Seminar room, Collins Library.

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Behind the Archives Door: The African American Communist Party Pamphlets, Thursday, October 19, 4 p.m., A&SC Seminar room, Collins Library

BTAD_BlkPwer3Lori Ricigliano, Reference and Learning Commons Coordinator and Associate Director for User Services, will showcase our unique collection of African American Communist Party pamphlets, as well as other new acquisitions related to African American history. 4:00–5:00 p.m. light refreshments and an informal lecture. Archives & Special Collections Seminar room, Collins Library.

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A Reset for the World’s System

ResetEllen K. Pao, the daughter of immigrants, taught through hard work she could achieve her dreams. Pao tells us her story of how even after earning multiple Ivy League degrees she was still cut out of CEO dinners, decisive meetings, lavish networking events, and had her work undercut or appropriated by male executives. After becoming CEO of reddit, Pao took forceful action to change the company’s status quo and its product. She and seven other women formed an award-winning nonprofit for accelerating diversity and inclusion in tech, known as Project Include. Reset is the story of a whistleblower who aims to empower the struggling to be heard.

Check it out in the Popular Reading Collection today!

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