The chalk man mystery from the past!

Chalk-ManEddie and his group of friends follow a chalk man and a message which leads them to the dismembered body of a teenage girl. Fast forward thirty years, Eddie is now an adult with a drinking problem, who is working as a teacher at his old school and is trying to forget his past. This is until he receives a letter containing a single chalk figure, the same one he saw that led him to the body. All his group of friends received the same anonymous letter. They try to brush the letters off as a prank until one of them is killed. Eddie realizes that he has to figure out what really happened thirty years ago, which proves more dangerous than anticipated.

Check it out in the Popular Reading Collection!

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Events/Exhibits in Collins Library – Spring Semester 2018

*EXHIBITS: We are pleased to host the following exhibit in the Collins Link:
Louder Than Words: A Portrait of the Black Panther Movement: (February 1-May 15, 2018)
Full list of library exhibits (past, present and future)

FEBRUARY

  • Exhibit: “Louder Than Words: A Portrait of the Black Panther Movement”, (February 1-May 15, 2018)
    Curated by Black Panther Party Archivist and Historian Bill Jennings, Louder than Words: A Portrait of the Black Panther Movement focuses on the Party’s social justice and community programs. The exhibit features a broad range of artifacts, including original pamphlets, newspapers, memorabilia and books on the Black Panther reading list. The Black Panther Party was founded in Oakland, California, by Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton while they attended college. Motivated by the Civil Rights Movement, the assassination of Malcolm X, and riots in Los Angeles, the initial impetus for the party was to protect local African American neighborhoods against police brutality. However, the party was more than armed patrols. It also established free breakfast programs, health clinics, and some of the first drug education programs. Billy Jennings grew up in San Diego and moved to Oakland in June 1968. He was a member of the Black Panther Party from 1968 to 1974. He currently works to maintain the legacy of the Black Panther Party, running the website It’s About Time which was started by former members of the Black Panther Party in Sacramento in 1995. The Link, Collins Library.
  • Monday, Feb. 12:  A Conversation with Bill Jennings, 4:00-6:00 p.m., Trimble Forum. For more information: pugetsound.edu/library

 

*********** (COMING LATER!) ***************************************

  • Puget Sound Book Artists:  Summer 2018
    (Details forthcoming)
  • Mark Hoppmann, Tacoma Artist: Fall 2018
    Partially funded by a Tacoma Artist Initiative Project (TAIP) grant from the Tacoma Arts Commission, The Imaginarium is an exhibition of new work by Tacoma book artist and illustrator, Mark Hoppmann. See if you can translate the cryptic text of Coptic bound,  Hidden Writings, a, handwritten and illustrated manuscript transcribed in a new alphabet inspired by the decaying wharfs of Tacoma’s seafaring past.Or explore the strange collection of images found in A Garden of Earthly Delights as the artist attempts to depict what Hieronymus Bosch’s masterpiece might have looked like had he lived in the present day Pacific Northwest.In addition to alliterative haiku in Ode to the Northwest, a collection of sketches titled Menagerie, and other new works, the exhibition will also include previous works not to mention many of the artist’s past and current sketchbooks, studies, and tools, all of which challenge the viewer’s perceptions of the Pacific Northwest and the art of the book.Mark Hoppmann graduated from Drake University with a BFA in graphic Design and Commercial Art in addition to studying art for one year in Florence Italy. After working for twenty years in the graphic arts industry as an offset pressman, prepress and bindery operator, he resumed his art career and has been an artist in Tacoma Washington, working primarily as a book artist, illustrator, and watercolor painter for the last twenty years. He says, I have always been curious. That curiosity has resulted in an eclectic accumulation of bric-a-brac, memories, experiences, and books, all which in turn, inspire my art. With apologies to Rudyard Kipling, my intent is to design illustrated books for those, “with ‘satiable curtiosity.” Simple and sometimes unadorned, but thoughtfully creative book designs hide a treasury of illustrations within.
  • Jessica Spring, Tacoma Artist:  Winter 2019
    Memory Lane, and the description for TAIP follows, though exactly what form this all takes I’m not yet sure. I’d love to include the work of other artists too, particularly non book artists. This exhibit is partially funded by a Tacoma Artist Initiative Project  (TAIP) grant from the Tacoma Arts Commission.As an aging artist having a front-row seat to my father’s ravaging by Alzheimer’s disease, memory continues to be an intriguing, even unavoidably nagging topic of interest. In a previous exhibition entitled “reCollection” I created a miniature museum of ephemera in Tacoma’s downtown Post Office building, examining how objects—even the most ephemeral—can be a trigger for memory.It is my intention to continue my investigation of this theme, particularly focusing on aspects of retention and loss. As humans we employ many memory aids—from digital apps to old-fashioned mnemonic devices—to readily access facts we need. Derived from the Greek μνημονικός (mnēmonikos) and related to Mnemosyne, the mythological goddess of memory, mnemonics make use of encoding, retrieval cues and imagery to better retain information. Ancient Greeks identified two types of memory: “natural” is inborn and used instinctively; and the other “artificial,” which one can train and develop. Commonly encountered mnemonics are often used for lists and in auditory form, such as acronyms or memorable phrases, but mnemonics can also be used in visual or kinesthetic forms.As a letterpress printer, I employ such mnemonic devices on a daily basis—to recall how type is distributed in cases (big cars drive elephants into small ford garages), adjust the height on a press (right raise / left lower), or mix inks (ROY G BIV)—and confess I still rely on reciting “30 days hath September…” to determine a month’s length. Wordplay makes a constant appearance in my work, so there is much here to inspire as I often employ text as image. I will draw from found materials, my collection of wood and metal type and ornaments to create an artist book, reinforcing and expanding the content with structure. I’m interested in exploring memory from multiple vantage points, both artistic and scientific, and that sweet spot where both dance together.
Past events blog:   Fall 2017 | Summer 2017 | Spring 2017
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From the Stacks – a few of our favorites

CALLOUT_PoemsEmilyDickinson

Photo courtesy of http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/dickinson.htm

1890: Poetry of
Emily Dickinson

Author/Editor:
Emily Dickinson

The  Poems of Emily Dickinson were first published in 1890 and are still in print today.  Many library resources, like the Concise Dictionary of American Literature,  provide insight into the life and work of Dickinson.

The Editor’s Commentary states, “This selection from her poems is published to meet the desire of her personal friends, and especially of her surviving sister.  It is believed that the thoughtful reader will find in these pages a quality more suggestive of the poetry of William Blake than of anything to be elsewhere found – flashes of wholly original and profound insight into nature and life; words and phrases exhibiting an extraordinary vividness of descriptive and imaginative power, yet often set in a seemingly whimsical or even rugged frame.” (p.3)

Prelude is the first poem in the book:

This is my letter to the world,
That never wrote to me, –
The simple news that Nature told,
With tender majesty.
Her message is committed
To hands I cannot see;
For love of her, sweet countrymen,
Judge tenderly of me?

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Sign up for our subscription to New York Times!

CALLOUT_NYTDon’t forget we have a subscription to the digital content for the New York Times – Sign up Now!  Click here to learn how.  Follow the directions to set up an account.

Did you know over 815 Loggers have registered for this service and we had over 5, 491 sessions!

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Artist Talk: “The Amazing World of Colette Fu: Pop-Up Book Engineer”, February 15, 6 p.m., Collins Library, Room 020

Colette-Fu_image-06Colette Fu received her M.F.A. in fine art photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2003, and soon after began devising complex compositions that incorporate photography and pop-up paper engineering. She has designed for award-winning stop motion animation commercials and free-lanced for clients including Vogue China, Canon Asia, Moët Hennessy–Louis Vuitton, and the Delaware Disaster Research Center. Her pop-up books are included in the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Library of Congress, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the West Collection, and many private and rare archive collections. In 2014, Fu attended a 6-month artist residency at the Swatch Art Peace Hotel in Shanghai, where she continued her We are Tiger Dragon project, an extensive visual exploration of China’s ethnic minorities. There she also designed China’s largest (single-spread) pop-up book, measuring 2.5 x 5 x 1.7 meters high.

In her own words: “Pop-up and flap books originally illustrated ideas about astronomy, fortune telling, navigation, anatomy of the body, and other scientific principles. This history prompted me to construct my own books reflecting ideas on how our selves relate to society today. My pop-ups are a way for me to speak and inform; the real and implied motion in the pop-ups link to a temporal element and an inevitable corollary is to awe and unsettle. Constructing pop-ups allows me to combine intuitive design and technical acuity with my love of traveling as I try to understand the world around me. With pop-up books I want to eliminate the boundaries between people, book, installation, photography, craft, sculpture.”

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Campus New York Times Access

CALLOUT_NYTDear Campus Community,

The New York Times is currently experiencing what they are calling a “systems glitch” which has impacted most of their institutional subscribers, including Puget Sound.  This is why those of you who have registered for institutional access are not being recognized when you access articles and/or try to register or re-register for an account.

The Times has assured us that they are working diligently to address the issue.

Our institutional subscription has been renewed for the coming year, and as soon as they address the technical issues they’re having you should have full access.

Please let me know if you have any questions, and fingers and toes crossed that they will resolve this soon.

Thank you very much for your patience,

Andrea Kueter, Social Sciences Librarian & Coordinator of Electronic Resources

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Exhibit Coming: “Louder Than Words: A Portrait of the Black Panther Movement”, February 1-May 15, 2018

Curated by Black Panther Party Archivist and Historian Bill X Jennings, Louder than Words: A Portrait of the Black Panther Movement focuses on the Party’s social justice and community programs. The Collins Memorial Library exhibit features a broad range of artifacts, including original pamphlets, newspapers, memorabilia and copies of the books on the Panther reading list.

The Black Panther Party was founded in Oakland, California, by Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton while they attended college. Motivated by the Civil Rights Movement, the assassination of Malcolm X, and riots in Los Angeles, the initial impetus for the party was to protect local African American neighborhoods against police brutality. However, the party was more than armed patrols. It also established free breakfast programs, health clinics, and some of the first drug education programs.

Billy Jennings grew up in San Diego and moved to Oakland in June 1968. He was a member of the Black Panther Party from 1968 to 1974. He currently works to maintain the legacy of the Black Panther Party, running the website It’s About Time which was started by former members of the Black Panther Party in Sacramento in 1995.

Bill Jennings will visit for an Archivist Talk on Feb. 12 at 4 p.m. Please check the library’s website for more information.

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Happy Holidays from the Collins Memorial Library

Best wishes for the new year!

Jones in winter 1977, image from the Archives & Special Collections

 

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A family mystery

FloatingWorldAs hurricane Katrina is fast approaching the Louisiana coast, Cora Boisdore, refuses to leave. Her parents, Joe Boisdore, a decedent from slaves, and his white wife, Dr. Tess Eshleman, are forced to evacuate without her. This sets off events that leave their marriage in shambles and Cora catatonic: the victim or perpetrator of mysterious violence. When Cora’s older sister, Del, arrives from her successful life in New York City, she returns to her hometown in ruins and her family deeply alienated from one another. Follow Del as she attempts to figure out what happened to her sister.

Check it out in the Popular Reading Collection!

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From the Archives & Special Collections: Studying vs. the Snow

Archives_snowman2With our stomachs still full from Thanksgiving dinner, we are forced to accept that finals are only a couple of weeks away. Of course it is easy to get distracted with this dark, rainy weather by imagining snow piles instead of rain puddles and mittens instead of umbrellas (but who uses one of those?). The snow could come though! But until it does, take a break from studying and check out the photos on A Sound Past to get some ideas of what to do when it does snow. You can build a snowman like the ladies from 1949 or get around campus on skis like these kids in 1993. One thing is for sure, when it snows, studying does not stand a chance.

The Archives & Special Collections is open on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from 12:00-3:00 p.m. or by appointment.

By Sierra Scott

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