Collins Welcomes New Librarian Angela Weaver

Collins Library is pleased to welcome new librarian Angela Weaver who will join us September 9, 2019.  Angela Weaver served as the Head of the Drama and Art Libraries and the Arts & Humanities Liaison Team leader at the University of Washington.  She has worked at UW since 2004 in positions of increasing responsibility and prior to joining the UW Libraries, served as a Fine and Performing Arts Librarian at George Mason University as well as worked as the Coordinator of Library Instruction at the University of Mississippi.  Angela not only has a Masters in Library Science but an MFA in Playwriting from UC, San Diego and a BA in Psychology from Duke University.  She is an accomplished scholar and professional and some of her contributions include the development of a web page at Rutgers titled Women of Color, Women of Words: African American Female Playwrights, she serves as the moderator for the list serve of African-American Female Playwrights and the African American Theatre and has participated in many diversity initiatives at the University of Washington. She was a panelist at our last Race & Pedagogy Conference contributing to the session: “Public Art and Expression on our Campuses: Context, Content, and Controversy.”  In addition, Angela coordinates digital humanities for her team and has recently completed an extensive project associated with Marie Antoinette, looking at different aspects of historical context using the platform of Pressbooks.  Angela is a seasoned teacher with an extensive history of working with primary source documents, connecting with students and faculty, with a passion for the subject areas for which she will be responsible for including theatre, art and art history, music, and African American Studies.

Learn more about Angela and her interests:

  1. What excites you about joining Puget Sound?
    Everything!  The opportunity to work closely with students in some of my favorite subject areas; to work collaboratively with colleagues to connect users to unique collections in enriching ways; and to integrate my interest in art, crafting, and digital humanities into my daily work. I’m also very excited by the super short commute–I only live about twenty minutes away from campus.
  1. Tell us a little about your background and interest in the fine and performing arts?
    I received a MFA in playwriting before I entered a MLS program, so I always knew I would be a librarian who focused on the performing arts, primarily drama. Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with art and art history, design, dance, and music as well.
  1. Can you tell us about your work with digital humanities?
    I was interested in a digital humanities project where I could use my personal research into the world of Marie Antoinette as part of my professional work. I decided on a dramaturgical casebook because students have to do historical/contextual research in order to contribute to the director’s vision on a production and that process lent itself to the platform I was using, Pressbooks. So I enlisted the help of Marie Andrews, an iSchool student, as part of her directed fieldwork assignment. Together we created a dramaturgical casebook for La France Sauvée, an unfinished play by Olympe de Gouges, an eighteenth century French playwright who was sent to the guillotine for treason. I was fortunate enough to find an English language version of the play online, translated by Clarissa Palmer, a scholar who has been translating the works of Olympe de Gouges. She gave me permission to use her text and Marie and I began working to create the casebook for the play. Later, I enlisted the help of a colleague, Deb Raftus, to record the names of the characters, so that users would have an idea of how the names sounded in French. Our goal was to create a model that faculty could use for engaging students with a dramatic text using a digital platform either in a classroom setting or as part of a production.
  1. Anything else you would like to share? 
    I am a huge Godzilla fan and own a number of action figures and nearly all of the films (can’t wait to purchase the new film, I’ve seen it twice already). I also love the character Wolverine from the X-Men movies and animated series; in addition to owning the films and a few Funko Pop figurines, I have a Wolverine tattoo on my upper arm based on one of the sumi-e ink drawing promotional posters created for the film The Wolverine (2013), which was set in Japan. If you’ve got an hour to kill, ask me about Logan (2017).  Okay, maybe two hours.
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Béatrice Coron: From Book Shelves to Cat Walk: Wearable papercuts and artist books, August 22, 4-5:30pm, Collins Library Room 053 (lower level)

Béatrice Coron will introduce the many facets of contemporary paper cutting as well as her artist’s journey in visual storytelling. From the historical roots of this art form to a panorama of international artists. This simple media took her from illustration to artist books, public art and animation. She will demonstrate its endless possibilities and applications where there is no limit but your imagination.

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Diana Weymar: Pages from Interwoven Stories, Aug. 1-Sept. 14, 2019, Collins Library, Gallery Room

We are pleased to exhibit a selection of pages from artist Diana Weymar’s Interwoven Stories project.  Interwoven Stories is a community stitching project that was started by Weymar, a Canadian artist,  supported by the Princeton Arts Council in New Jersey.  The project has expanded to include stitched pages from a number of organizations in this country and abroad.  The University of Puget Sound contributed a chapter to Interwoven Stories as a result of a residency Weymar had on our campus several years ago.  Titled, Refashioning Identity, the Puget Sound pages explore gendered assumptions governing needlework in the past and images that might express and transform our perceptions.  The images also address the way in which we “refashion” our identities to better reflect the diversity of our experiences in the community.  Other chapters on display include pages from the Peddie School, Hightstown, New Jersey.  These pages were done by art students who explored the cultural context of images shared on social media by stitching images that they commonly share within their community.  Pages from the Trans Tipping Point project in Victoria, BC., focus on messages to elevate the voices of trans youth. The pages from the Build Peace from Zurich, Switzerland and Bogota, Columbia bring together practitioners, activists, artists and technologists from around the world to share experience and ideas on using technology, arts and other innovations for peacebuilding and conflict transformation.

Also highlighted in the exhibition is information about Weymar’s latest project:  Tiny Pricks.  Tiny Pricks has received international attention and was recently highlighted in The New Yorker Magazine:  https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/07/22/stitch-n-bitch-for-the-trump-era.  This politically charged stitching effort invites members of the public to contribute stitched quotes of the President on antique or old fabric.  As Weymar states in the New Yorker, “ “This makes me so happy, I can’t tell you,” she said. “I woke up this morning, and I thought, How early can I come in? People are just at home, frustrated. They can’t talk about politics anymore. This project is like a treasure hunt. You find the quote that really resonates for you. Like, where were you the moment you heard him say this, and you thought, Ohnononono. That’s not possible. That he’s our President. That he’s our President. In that sense, I think of it as a memorial, too—like when you see the Vietnam Memorial, the multitudes is what hits you.”

Details about how to contribute are available in the exhibition space and online.

Collins Library is also hosting our own stitching project described below.  We hope you will Pick Up the Thread!

Pick Up the Thread

Are you inspired by the Interwoven Stories pages?  If so, you have a chance to join our Stitching on Paper project!  The example on the wall was done by Puget Sound student Carlisle Huntington.

Read more about stitching on paper and work of artist Jessica A. Kelly by browsing the articles on the table.

Want to contribute?  Just follow these easy steps:

  1. Select a page from our basket.
  2. Borrow a needle and some thread or use your own.
  3. Fill out a short entry form.
  4. Return your page and entry form to the Library Administration Office between now and December 1, 2019.
  5. We will add your stitched page to this wall!

Stuck for an idea?  Stitch a single word that describes Puget Sound, a favorite quote, stitch around a letter, a note of music or an illustration!

 

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Tacoma to Glasgow – art, architecture, libraries and much more! – Jane Carlin, Director, Collins Library

Thanks to an international travel award sponsored by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the Art Libraries Society of North America, I had the opportunity to travel 4,400 miles from Seattle to Glasgow, Scotland to attend the Art Libraries Society of UK and Ireland’s 50th Anniversary Conference and Celebration.  The support and professional opportunities provided by the Kress Foundation help broaden and enrich the library community and for that I am truly grateful.

Glasgow is a vibrant city with some similarities to Tacoma.  Both are industrial cities with a strong tie to industry and maritime industry with vibrant art communities.

The Conference was held at the University of Glasgow.

Founded in 1451, the University of Glasgow is the fourth oldest university in the English-speaking world and is rated as one of the top 100 of the world’s universities.

The Conference offered the opportunity to engage with ARLIS UK & Ireland colleagues and to learn about new programs and services that are being offered in art libraries.   One aspect of the Conference that is quite different from our ARLIS/NA conference is the scale.  This Conference was much smaller in number and provided unique opportunities to delve into discussions.  The Conference consisted of a variety of plenary sessions, interspersed with panels and lightning rounds.  A great feature of the Conference were the many tours arranged to showcase the unique art and libraries of Glasgow.

Conference highlights are listed below:

  • Keynote Address: John Scally.  Dr. Scally is the National Librarian and Chief Executive of the National Library of Scotland.  In his address he outlined efforts to elevate the status of the Library and to raise its profile amongst European counterparts.  The Library has over 27 million physical items, and in recent years has begun an aggressive program to expand the digital collections.  Included are excellent digital collections of art and design, medieval manuscripts and maps: https://www.nls.uk/collections/digital-collections
  • Keynote Address: Robyne Calvert:  From Tome to Tomb:  The Birth, Death, and Reconstruction of Mackintosh’s Library.  Art librarians around the world were shocked and saddened to learn about the destruction of the Mackintosh Building at the Glasgow School of Art.  Fire ripped through the building in 2014 and again in June 2018.  Dr. Calvert, a cultural historian, focused on the restoration of the site and reconstruction.
  • Keynote Address: David Dibosa:  Re-worlding our knowledge.  A thought provoking presentation on how we (librarians) address how we reflect upon the knowledge classification of the past which is often encased, as the Conference abstract states: “in a structure that has historically privileged some forms of knowledge while disregarding others.  For instance, Western perspectives, built up over successive generations are being regarded as skewed; deeply implicated in colonial projects that could not serve the needs of those who have been historically disempowered.”
  • Gustavo Grandal Monteiro, Chelsea College of Art: Decolonizing the art library:  some initiatives at University of the Arts London.  Gustavo’s presentation addressed how libraries can proactively address issues of diversity, equality, racism and equality of opportunity.  He referenced the video Decolonizing the University sponsored by the Pluto Press which focuses on the situation at the University of Cape Town to banish the statue of Cecil Rhodes:  https://plutopress.podbean.com/e/episode-12-decolonising-the-university/.  He then turned to some practical examples at the University of the Arts including:
  • Bec Wonders, Glasgow School of Art: Behind the veil: mapping feminist periodicals, 1970-1990.  Bec discussed her work with largely undocumented collections of feminist periodicals at the Glasgow Women’s Library.  Through examination of text, review of letters to the editors, as well as themes, she has used mapping software https://gephi.org/ ) that sheds new light on the discourse of this narrative and allows scholars to re-examine feminist publishing history.
  • Laura Elliott & Alice Harvey, Goldsmith’s University: Liberate our Library:  Embedding social justice work in everyday practice.  This presentation focused on the Liberate our Library initiative that is in place at Goldsmith’s as an effort to increase the representation of marginalized voices and diversify the collections.  The presenters offered practical suggestions for how this might be done:
    • Resistance Researching Workshops: Workshops are designed to ask students to think more deeply about how they conduct research and what the implications are associated with critical evaluation of resources.
    • Liberate my Degree Book Funds and Purchases: This is a visible and proactive way to showcase the effort and engage students.
    • Diversity Reading Lists: See more at https://www.gold.ac.uk/library/about/liberate-our-library/
  • Visit to the Glasgow Women’s Library:  I had the opportunity to present at the ARLIS/UK & Ireland Conference in 2018 and made the acquaintance of Adele Patrick, one of the founders of the Glasgow Women’s Library and as a result a great collaboration described in #3 below developed.

The history of the organization is well documented on the website:  https://womenslibrary.org.uk/about-us/our-history/.  What strikes me as so impactful is that this organization started out as a truly a grass roots effort that has developed into a major arts center and archival repository celebrating women in Scotland and throughout the world.  We had the opportunity to learn about the organization and participate in a behind the scenes tour of the archival collections.

Connecting with colleagues from other countries broadens our horizons and also offers the opportunity to look at our work from new perspectives while at the same time recognizing many of the constant themes of librarianship. This Conference was focused on issues of social justice and equity and as a Library Director for a liberal arts college many of the ideas and programs can be implemented at my own institution.  In addition, the opportunity to continue to build on the collaboration with the Glasgow Women’s Library was very important.  In the fall of 2019, the Collins Library will be staging an exhibit titled All Stitched Up.  As part of the exhibit, I have had the opportunity to borrow a work from the Glasgow Women’s Library.  Alinah Azadeh’s Secret Knowledge takes the form of fabric-covered books wrapped like beautiful gifts.

Secret Knowledge was included in an international touring exhibition entitled Tall Tales in which women explored the complexity of the human experience.  In the work Secret Knowledge, Alinah Azadeh reflects on the long used ritual of textile wrapping of deceased objects; both to separate from and honor the past.

In addition, I have secured grant funding for Adele Patrick, one of the Library’s founders, to be in residence at the University of Puget Sound in November 2019 and be a keynote speaker at a one day Symposium associated with the exhibition.


Her presentation is titled:  The threads that bound a spine: art, texts and collaboration in the making of a women’s libraryShe is an energetic leader in the arts and her work has inspired and enabled women artists throughout the UK to share their stories.  Dr. Patrick has been developing innovative, participatory cultural projects rooted in equalities for over 25 years.  A co-founder of Glasgow Women’s Library (GWL) Adele has had a leadership role in forging this influential, change making organization.  Trained as an embroidery and woven textile designer at Glasgow School of Art (where she subsequently taught Gender, Art and Culture), her doctoral research at University of Stirling focuses on feminism and self-fashioning.  In 2016 Adele was awarded Honorary Doctorates from the School and from Strathclyde University and was awarded the honor of being named the Scotswoman of the Year.  In 2018 she began a Clore Leadership Fellowship, her current Post Fellowship research (in collaboration with Goldsmiths, London) focuses on feminist leadership approaches. www.womenslibrary.org.uk.

Without the opportunity to travel and attend the conferences, these international collaborations would not be possible.  This not only impacts my own development, but offers the opportunity to expose and inspire our Puget Sound students and faculty to new ideas and foster additional collaboration.

And some fun facts about Glasgow and Scotland!

Oor Wullie:  Walking around Glasgow there are Oor Wullie statues all over.  I soon found that Oor Wullie  is one of Scotland’s favorite comic characters, first established in 1936.  The Oor Wullie statues are part of a nationwide public art trail supporting Scotland’s Children’s hospital.  Visit this site to learn more: https://www.visitscotland.com/blog/attractions/oor-wullie-bucket-trail/

Below is a photo of an Oor Wullie in the heart of Glasgow.  I didn’t quite understand why he has a cone on his head, until I read that the statue of the Duke of Wellington (right next to Oor Wullie) has been wearing a traffic cone for years.  Apparently it started out as a prank and every time it was removed, it somehow mysteriously returned on the statue so has now become a fixture in Glasgow culture.

Whiskey:  You can’t visit Scotland without thinking about scotch, right? While the thought of joining a highland scotch tasting tour was tempting, I kept my nose to the ground and focused on the Conference.  However, the Glasgow Airport has a great tasting area where they were most generous with their “wee drams.”

Irn-Bru:  This bright orange fizzy drink is a Scottish favorite and some say a staple in every house and is known as Scotland’s other national drink. It’s so popular, it even has its own tartan.

Battered Mars Bar:  I didn’t succumb to this culinary treat, but one of my colleagues did and here is the photo to prove it.  A Mars bar is a lot like a 3 Musketeer.  It is then covered in batter and deep fried.  The perfect accompaniment to your fish and chips!

Tunnock’s Biscuits (biscuits meaning cookies):  Tunnock’s has been in business since 1890 and these wafers with caramel and chocolate are an alternative to the fried mars bar!  Thanks to the Conference organizers for supplying these yummy treats.

Tea Time:  Kate Cranston was an entrepreneur that was responsible for the rise of the Tea Room in Glasgow.  She commissioned Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the renowned Scottish architect, to design her tea rooms.  The Willow Tea Room, recently restored to full glory, remains a masterpiece of design and beauty.  Glasgow was a center for the tea trade and Thomas Lipton developed his brand in Glasgow.

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All Stitched Up Book Arts Symposium, November 2, 2019, 9:00-3:00pm, Collins Library and the Tahoma Room

November 2
9:00 to 3:00pm
Collins Memorial Library and the Tahoma Room, Thomas Hall: University of Puget Sound

Registration is required for this event and details concerning registration costs will be posted soon.

Collins Memorial Library in collaboration with Puget Sound Book Artists is pleased to sponsor a one day Symposium associated with the All Stitched Up exhibition.

This one day event will focus on the creative process and feature a number of artists represented in the show.

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Adele Patrick, co-founder and Creative Development Manager, Glasgow Women’s Library:  The threads that bound a spine: art, texts and collaboration in the making of a women’s library.

We’re delighted to welcome Dr. Adele Patrick to Tacoma. She is an energetic leader in the arts and her work has inspired and enabled women artists throughout the UK to share their stories.  Her work as an artist and advocate will inspire you and reflect our exhibition them of collaboration. Dr. Patrick has been developing innovative, participatory cultural projects rooted in equalities for over 25 years. A co-founder of Glasgow Women’s Library (GWL) Adele has had a leadership role in forging this influential, change making organization in the Museums sector. Trained as an  embroidery and woven textile designer at Glasgow School of Art (where she subsequently taught Gender, Art and Culture), her doctoral research at University of Stirling focuses on feminism and self-fashioning. In 2016 Adele was awarded Honorary Doctorates from the School and from Strathclyde University and was Scotswoman of the Year. Continually collaborating with artists, writers and other creatives Adele received the Engage Scholarship for Excellence in Gallery Education also in 2016. In 2018 she began a Clore Leadership Fellowship, her current Post Fellowship research (in collaboration with Goldsmiths, London) focuses on feminist leadership approaches. www.womenslibrary.org.uk

Lucy Childs:  Book Artist, Sewn Stories: Using Thread to Build Narratives

From top: Emma Lazarus 3, North Beach On Quiet Island.v2,
Whatever Happened To Louisa.v1_02, Whatever Happened To Louisa.v3

Lucy Childs is an accomplished artist based in the California Bay area whose work embraces stitching and embroidery. She began exhibiting her artwork, including paintings, sculpture, and artist’s books, in the mid-70s; and in 2014 began using embroidery as her medium. This new work includes a murder mystery, a series depicting life on the imaginary Quiet Island, and a five-panel narrative showing the gradual healing of an open wound. Lucy moved to the Bay Area to attend the California College of Arts and Crafts, graduating in the mid-70s; and she now lives now in Martinez, California, with her husband and their Maine coon cat, Scoobie. Of her practice, Lucy states:  “My embroidered work includes artist’ books and wall pieces: narratives, landscapes and maps, and conceptual pieces about rips and mending or borders and edges. I experiment with stitches, color, patterns, narratives, and concepts.” Find more about Lucy Childs:  lucychildsbookarts.com. For her artist books, she is represented by The Kelmscott Bookshop, Baltimore Maryland.

The Symposium will also feature a panel of artists represented in the exhibition that will explore aspects of collaboration and the art of stitching as well as feature a series of short talks by individual artists.

The Symposium will commence in the morning at Collins Library with the opportunity to view the exhibition and to hear some opening remarks by Catherine Alice Michaels.  We will then move to the Symposium space for presentations and lunch.

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Events/Exhibits in Collins Library – Summer/Fall 2019

JUNE

JULY

  • July 1: PSBA Lecture, Rebecca Chamlee, 4-5:30pm, Library Room 053
  • July 8: Puget Sound Book Artists 2019 – Artists Conversation, 5:30-7:30 pm, Library Room 053
  • July 25: Puget Sound Book Artists 2019 – Panel Discussion, 5:30-7:30 pm, Library Room 053

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

  • September 3: Exhibit: All Stitched Up: An international juried book arts exhibition, September 3rd – December 11th, 2019, Collins Library University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA
    To stitch is to join together, to mend, or fasten as with stitches – to sew. To stitch is to bring together fabric, paper, wounds of the body, or cultural divides. Stitching can be an act of healing, hope, practicality, creativity, and revolution. All Stitched Up recognizes and celebrates the work of book artists’ where stitching has become an integral part of the visual design. Curators Catherine Alice Michaelis, Jane A. Carlin, and Diana Weymar will jury the show and a print catalogue will be created.
  • September 10: AHSS Symposium, 3:30-5:00pm, Reading Room, Collins Library.
    Registration is required for this event and details concerning registration costs will be posted soon.
    Collins Memorial Library in collaboration with Puget Sound Book Artists is pleased to sponsor a one day Symposium associated with the All Stitched Up exhibition.
    This one day event will focus on the creative process and feature a number of artists represented in the show.
  • September 14: Lecture: A Mind at Work: May Morris and Subversive Stitching, 1:30-3:00pm, Collins Library Room 053 (lower level). Due to limited seating, we are asking you to register for this lecture.  Please click on this link and follow the registration process:  https://pugetsoundbookartists.wildapricot.org/event-3503998/Registration

    In this presentation, Dr. Wager will explore the work of May Morris (1862-1938), an accomplished designer, embroiderer, public speaker, writer, educator, advocate for social causes, and founder of the Women’s Guild of Arts. Morris’s legacy is tied to her father, William Morris, and his role as the leader of the British Arts and Crafts movement. Recent scholarship and exhibitions have excavated Morris’s embroidery designs, objects, writings, and her influence on artistic communities. This talk will focus on the objects of her creation, and how her works fits into a broader nineteenth-century history of stitching and revolutionary action.
    Anna Wager is the Clarence A. Davis Visual Arts Curator at Hobart & William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY. She directs the exhibition spaces on campus and manages the permanent collection. She also teaches courses related to cataloging, curatorial writing, exhibition design, and the history of museums, through the lens of 19th- and early 20th-century English and American art and material culture. She holds a PhD in art history from the University of Washington, and is a member of the William Morris Society board.
    This event is sponsored by the Collins Library, the William Morris Society in the United States and Puget Sound Book Artists.

  • September 14: All Stitched Up – Opening Celebration, 3:30-5:00pm, Collins Library, Link and Gallery Room.

NOVEMBER

November 1:  Tiny Pricks Project: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump, 4:00–5:30pm, Collins Library Room 053 (lower level).
There will be over 700 pieces at the time of the conference. To view pieces created to date, please follow the series on Diana Weymar. Tiny Pricks counterbalances the impermanence of Twitter, social media, and Trump’s overall approach to politics. Weymar, who lives in British Columbia,  is also the founder of Interwoven Stories, a collection of stitched pages that focus on personal narratives and stories.
The project is open for public participation until Trump is out of office and that the series can be followed on IG @tinypricksproject.
Diana is making a return visit to Puget Sound as she also was a visiting artist two years ago and contributed to the project Refashioning Identity, in which members of the Puget Sound community contributed stitched pages.  Pages from Tiny Pricks, Interwoven Stories and Refashioning Identify on display in the Collins Library in conjunction with the All Stitched Up exhibit.  Weymar served as one of the jurors of the exhibit.

November 2:  All Stitched Up Book Arts Symposium, 9:00-3:00pm, Collins Memorial Library and the Tahoma Room, Thomas Hall: University of Puget Sound.

Spring 2019 Events

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Collins Library Links: Book Collecting Contest

2013_CollinsLibraryLink

Book Collecting Contest
What better way to end the year with a celebration of student scholarship,
reading, and supporting a new generation of book collectors.

We recognize The Book Club of Washington for their support of Puget Sound students. The aim of the competition was to encourage full-time students at University of Puget Sound to read for enjoyment and to develop personal libraries throughout their lives, to appreciate the special qualities of printed or illustrated works, and to read, research, and preserve the collected works for pleasure and scholarship.

The award was sponsored by the Book Club of Washington, a nonprofit organization of book lovers and collectors who has a special interest in collecting and preserving printed materials.  It is a goal of the club to support a new generation of collectors with awards and recognition of their collecting accomplishments.  The club held its annual awards reception on April 25th, where the University of Puget Sound and all student participants were recognized for their achievement.

Winners from Puget Sound are able to enter the National Collegiate Book Collecting contest which is supported by The Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA), the Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies (FABS), the Grolier Club, and the Center for the Book and the Rare Books and Special Collections Division (the Library of Congress) have jointly assumed leadership of the National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest, with major and exclusive support for the Kislak Prize from the Jay I. Kislak Foundation.

Thanks are extended to everyone who assisted with this event and special thanks to Andrea Klyn, Social Sciences Librarian/Electronic Resources Coordinator, for serving as a judge.

Congratulations to Tanner Abernathy, Cassandra Childs, and
Nicholas Duke-Bruechert, winners of the 2019 Book Collecting Contest

 

Collins Choice Award
Tanner Abernathy
“Tolkien’s Arda: Accessible Mythology & Moral Hermeneutics in Fantasy”

The Collins Choice Award recognizes a student whose collection illustrates the hallmarks of a liberal arts education.  The collector in this case categorized their collection into three broad categories, tales, compendiums and supplements, and images, and then clearly articulated how each ‘artifact’ fit into the category while also exploring their larger meaning and connections to each other.  They cited additional sources used, and visually presented their collection in a cohesive, well thought out manner, clearly articulating their rationale for including each item in the collection, and how it related to the collection and theme as a whole.  They also collected various types of materials including dictionaries, atlases, coloring books, games, films and primary texts, all of which specifically addressed the subject of the collection in their own unique way.  Throughout this collection, it is clear that the collector has a strong passion and interest in the world and works of Tolkien, and the love of the collection is clear in the intentional way that the material is presented.

Best Essay
Cassandra Childs
“Collecting Tolkien: Treasuring the Pioneer of Fantasy”

In the chosen essay, the author provides us with a glimpse of how an early exposure to Tolkien literature led to an academic pursuit of the fantasy genre.  This is a great example of how a collector can take a group of fairly standard books and make them into something special by exploring and explaining a personal connection.  Learning more about Tolkien himself is explained in the clearly synthesized and well represented annotated bibliography.  A great deal of time and effort clearly went into the essay and annotations, and the writer’s interest in fantasy literature as explored in this essay made this a wonderful pleasure to read.

1st Place/Single Collector Award
Nicholas Duke-Bruechert
“Lifelong Failure”

The first place, or single collector, award acknowledges the combination of an excellent, integrated and comprehensive essay, a well annotated bibliography, collection images, and a thoughtful wish list.  The “Incomplete Collection” of Superhero comic books is a creative way to explore failure.  Here the collector has taken something we all face in our daily lives, and through his essay and descriptive bibliography explained how Superheros survived failure.  The collection essay captures the initial efforts of the collector, particularly his draw to The Amazing Spider-Man issue #96.  The name of the collection leaves plenty of room for the Collector to expand on the “failure” theme, as well as others that can be drawn from comic books.

This collection successfully uses comic books to explore a timeless theme — failure and how to learn from experience.  The collector has done an especially good job of articulating the importance of the collection to him, discussing how it relates to his own struggles and work ethic.  It is great that he managed to collect older comics as far back as the 1960s.  The essay and item captions are extremely well written — philosophical but still accessible to non-experts.


Need Information? Don’t forget the Collins Memorial Library – Library Guides
Questions? Contact your liaison librarian
Comments: Contact Jane Carlin, library director
Remember – Your best search engine is a librarian!

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Tiny Pricks Project: Tweets, Textiles, and Trump, November 1, 2019, 4:00–5:30pm, Collins Library Room 053 (lower level)

Image courtesy of http://www.textilemonth.nyc/2017
-events/2018/9/20/tiny-pricks-tweets-textiles-and-trump

Artist Diana Weymar is the founder of Tiny Pricks Project, a project in which participants stitch quotes by Trump into antique or inherited textiles to create a material record of his presidency. Pieces are donated to a travelling collection that has been exhibited around the country. The methodology of the project is based on social media sharing, participatory political protest, and craftivism.

Diana Weymar pictured with a textile from Interwoven Stories. http://themakehouse.ca/2015/10/diana-weymar-clothing-art/

There are over 700 in the collection but it would be impossible to have them all there and some might be on loan somewhere else. They take up a massive amount of space at this point. To view pieces created to date, please follow the series on Diana Weymar. Tiny Pricks counterbalances the impermanence of Twitter, social media, and Trump’s overall approach to politics. Weymar, who lives in British Columbia,  is also the founder of Interwoven Stories, a collection of stitched pages that focus on personal narratives and stories.

The project is open for public participation until Trump is out of office and that the series can be followed on IG @tinypricksproject.

Diana is making a return visit to Puget Sound as she also was a visiting artist two years ago and contributed to the project Refashioning Identity, in which members of the Puget Sound community contributed stitched pages.  Pages from Tiny Pricks, Interwoven Stories and Refashioning Identify on display in the Collins Library in conjunction with the All Stitched Up exhibit.  Weymar served as one of the jurors of the exhibit.

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Lecture: A Mind at Work: May Morris and Subversive Stitching, September 14, 2019, 1:30-3:00pm, Collins Library Room 053 (lower level)

In this presentation, Dr. Wager will explore the work of May Morris (1862-1938), an accomplished designer, embroiderer, public speaker, writer, educator, advocate for social causes, and founder of the Women’s Guild of Arts. Morris’s legacy is tied to her father, William Morris, and his role as the leader of the British Arts and Crafts movement. Recent scholarship and exhibitions have excavated Morris’s embroidery designs, objects, writings, and her influence on artistic communities. This talk will focus on the objects of her creation, and how her works fits into a broader nineteenth-century history of stitching and revolutionary action.

Book cover for Embroidery and Lace,
May Morris, c. 1888-91

Anna Wager is the Clarence A. Davis Visual Arts Curator at Hobart & William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY. She directs the exhibition spaces on campus and manages the permanent collection. She also teaches courses related to cataloging, curatorial writing, exhibition design, and the history of museums, through the lens of 19th- and early 20th-century English and American art and material culture. She holds a PhD in art history from the University of Washington, and is a member of the William Morris Society board.

This event is sponsored by the Collins Library, the William Morris Society in the United States and Puget Sound Book Artists.

Due to limited seating, we are asking you to register for this lecture.  Please click on this link and follow the registration process:  https://pugetsoundbookartists.wildapricot.org/event-3503998/Registration

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Ada Hoch-Schneider Wins Library Art Award 2019

Each year the Collins Memorial Library sponsors an award for a graduating Art major.  The monetary award is $250 and the honor of displaying their art work in a prominent spot in the library for a term of one year.  The winning art work is selected from a preview of the senior show by a Library panel.

Collins Library is pleased to bestow the 2019 Senior Art Award to Ada Hoch-Schneider for her sculpture “Lobus.”

Ada’s work focuses on the importance of sustainability in design, and acknowledges everything has a monetary and environmental cost. The selection committee chose this work because of the artist’s statement regarding her thoughtful use of recycled materials and her concern about contributing to the garage on earth. Out of discarded fabrics and single use items, Ada has pieced together an object that resembles a fluffy cloud. The sculpture “Lobus” evokes a sense of lightness, reminds us of childhoods spent outdoors, and suggests a positive approach to waste use is possible.  Her whimsical cloud skillfully crafted out of discarded materials invites us to look at a different end for fabric and other resource waste.

We are proud to have “Lobus” grace the Learning Commons area of the Collins Library so Ada’s artistic talents and important message can enrich our local community.

Congratulations Ada!

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Artist Statement

I find myself unable to separate waste and my artistic practice. Waste has often been a point of contention in my work and life in general as I feel the need to know exactly how to work material, mould it, manipulate it, and struggle to justify my use of it as a resource. Unable to remove the monetary and environmental cost from my mind, room for exploration and margin of error dwindles. Every part of my work must be worth the resources and space it inhabits or else I have failed, contributing to the overflow of garbage we leave on this planet. I am invariably present in the work; my own worth invested in it, leaves me with little in the way of rational reasoning to pursue artistic expression at all.

Working with fabric waste I am able to set aside parts of my ego and my own insufficiencies. Making becomes a practice. Sewing becomes a self-examination. Through piecing together each cut edge, puckered seam and twisted contour, I test my limits of craft, colour, shape and line recovering my love for art and creation in a medium I have known so well.  These leftover scraps are discarded silhouettes produced by an industry focused on the expression of self and individuality, but what it leaves behind is, in part, more informative then the products designed.  The material allows me to recall my love of fashion and sewing without my practice taking a backseat to the investment of resources. The only goal being the work itself and giving three dimensional form to something that often remains invisible.

– Ada Hoch-Schneider

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